uscensus banner
| MAIN | SEARCH | FEEDBACK | FAQ | GLOSSARY | COUNTRIES | MAPS | ITA HOME PAGE |

Custom Search

MAIN CATEGORIES:
1. Population
2. Vital Statistics
3. Health and Nutrition
4. Education
5. Law Enforcement, Courts
and Prisons
6. Geography and Environment
7. Parks, Recreation, Travel
8. Elections
9. State and Local Government
Finances and Employment
10. Federal Government
Finances and Employment
11. National Defense and
Veterans Affairs
12. Social Insurance and Human
Services
13. Labor Force, Employment,
and Earnings
14. Income, Expenditures, and
Wealth
15. Prices
16. Banking, Finance, and
Insurance
17. Business Enterprise
18. Communications and
Information Technology
19. Energy
20. Science and Technology
21. Transportation - Land
22. Transportation - Air
and Water
23. Agriculture
24. Natural Resources
25. Construction and Housing
26. Manufactures
27. Domestic Trade and
Services
28. Foreign Commerce and Aid
29. Outlying Areas
30. Comparative International
Statistics
31. Industrial Outlook
32. 1997 Economic Census





757. Persons Below Poverty Level, by Selected Characteristics

[Persons as of March of the following year. Based on Current Population Survey; see text, sections 1 and 14, Appendix III, and summary below. For composition of regions, see below] NORTHEAST: Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania. MIDWEST: Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Iowa, Missouri, North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, and Kansas. SOUTH: Delaware, Maryland, District of Columbia, Virginia, West Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Kentucky, Tennessee, Alabama, Mississippi, Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma, and Texas. WEST: Montana, Idaho, Wyoming, Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona, Utah, Nevada, Washington, Oregon, California, Alaska, and Hawaii]

 
1997 1997
NUMBER BELOW POVERTY LEVEL (1,000) PERCENT BELOW POVERTY LEVEL
Age and region
All His- All His-
races1 White Black panic2 races1 White Black panic2
 
     Total................................................................ 35,574 24,396 9,116 8,308 13.3 11.0 26.5 27.1
 
Under 18 years old............................................. 14,113 8,990 4,225 3,972 19.9 16.1 37.2 36.8
18 to 24 years old................................................ 4,416 3,131 1,041 979 17.5 15.5 28.0 25.8
25 to 34 years old.............................................. 4,759 3,327 1,106 1,201 12.1 10.5 20.9 21.9
35 to 44 years old.................................................. 4,251 2,928 1,063 992 9.6 8.0 19.3 21.5
45 to 54 years old................................................ 2,439 1,817 489 427 7.2 6.3 13.3 15.8
55 to 59 years old.................................................. 1,092 778 270 191 9.0 7.4 22.2 20.5
60 to 64 years old................................................ 1,127 857 222 161 11.2 9.9 22.1 22.9
65 years old and over ........................................... 3,376 2,569 700 384 10.5 9.0 26.0 23.8
  65 to 74 years old............................................... 1,641 1,198 383 214 9.2 7.6 23.8 21.1
  75 years old and over........................................ 1,735 1,370 316 170 12.2 10.7 29.3 28.2
 
Northeast................................................................ 6,474 4,373 1,788 1,533 12.6 10.2 28.5 31.8
Midwest................................................................. 6,493 4,546 1,696 532 10.4 8.3 27.4 23.4
South.................................................................... 13,748 8,473 4,895 2,500 14.6 11.7 25.7 25.3
West........................................................................ 8,858 7,004 738 3,744 14.6 13.8 24.9 27.4
 
 
  NUMBER BELOW POVERTY LEVEL (1,000) PERCENT BELOW POVERTY LEVEL
 
  NUMBER BELOW POVERTY LEVEL (1,000) PERCENT BELOW POVERTY LEVEL
Age and region
  All His- All His-
  races1 White Black panic2 races1 White Black panic2
 
     Total................................................................ 34,476 23,454 9,091 8,070 __________ 12.7 10.5 26.1 25.6
 
Under 18 years old............................................. 13,467 8,443 4,151 3,837 __________ 18.9 15.1 36.7 34.4
18 to 24 years old................................................ 4,312 3,023 1,043 1,010 __________ 16.6 14.6 27.2 25.6
25 to 34 years old.............................................. 4,582 3,171 1,113 1,225 __________ 11.9 10.3 21.2 22.1
35 to 44 years old.................................................. 4,082 2,906 998 938 __________ 9.1 7.9 17.8 20.3
45 to 54 years old................................................ 2,444 1,754 551 418 __________ 6.9 5.9 14.3 14.6
55 to 59 years old.................................................. 1,165 853 266 158 __________ 9.2 7.9 21.3 16.2
60 to 64 years old................................................ 1,039 749 252 128 __________ 10.1 8.4 24.2 17.6
65 years old and over ........................................... 3,386 2,555 718 356 __________ 10.5 8.9 26.4 21.0
  65 to 74 years old............................................... 1,616 1,135 411 224 __________ 9.1 7.3 25.6 20.5
  75 years old and over........................................ 1,770 1,420 307 132 __________ 12.2 10.8 27.4 21.9
 
Northeast................................................................ 6,357 4,081 1,949 1,436 __________ 12.3 9.5 29.9 29.6
Midwest................................................................. 6,501 4,475 1,751 486 __________ 10.3 8.1 27.2 20.3
South.................................................................... 12,992 7,761 4,807 2,430 __________ 13.7 10.7 25.3 23.5
West........................................................................ 8,625 7,137 584 3,717 __________ 14.0 13.8 20.3 26.7
 



1 Includes other races not shown separately.
2 Persons of Hispanic origin may be of any race.

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Current Population Reports, Poverty in the United States, P60-189, P60-194, P60-198, P60-201, P60-207, and earlier reports.

http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/poverty.html

* CURRENT POPULATION SURVEY (MARCH ANNUAL DEMOGRAPHIC SURVEY)

Approximately 62,500 housing units were eligible to receive the 1995 Annual Demographic Survey. The basic monthly CPS sample of 60,000 housing units was supplemented by 2,500 housing units which had at least one Hispanic member the previous November. In addition, members of the Armed Forces, which are excluded from the basic CPS labor force survey, were part of the elibigle population in March. Because of the CPS sample rotation system, approximately one-half of the sample had been interviewed the previous March.

Interviewers used lap-top computers to administer the interview, asking questions as they appear on the screen and directly entering the responses obtained. With the exception of first and the fifth month-in-sample interviews, when an interviewer usually visited the sample unit, over 90 percent of the interviews were conducted by telephone.

Completed interviews were electronically transmitted to a central processor where the responses were edited for consistency, imputations were made for missing data, and various codes were added. Based on the probability of selection, a weight was added to each supplement-responding household and person record so that estimates of the population by state, race, age, sex, and Hispanic origin matched the population projections made by the Bureau of the Census. Since not every person who provided labor force information completed the supplement and the supplement was asked of members of the Armed Forces, the supplement weights vary from those used for labor force estimation.

* DEFINITIONS

Poverty definition

Poverty statistics presented in this report are based on a definition developed by Mollie Orshansky of the Social Security Administration (SSA) in 1964 and revised in 1969 and 1981 by interagency committees. This definition was established as the official definition of poverty for statistical use in all Executive departments by the Bureau of the Budget (BoB) in 1969 (IN CIRCULAR NO. A-46); after BoB became Office of Management and Budget, this was reconfirmed in Statistical Policy Directive No. 14.

The original poverty index provided a range of income cutoffs or thresholds adjusted by such factors as family size, sex of the family head, number of children under 18 years old, and farm- nonfarm residence. At the core of this definition of poverty was the economy food plan, the least costly of four nutritionally adequate food plans designed by the Department of Agriculture. It was determined from the Department of Agriculture's 1955 Household Food Consumption Survey that families of three or more persons spent approximately one-third of their after-tax money income on food; accordingly, poverty thresholds for families of three or more persons were set at three times the cost of the economy food plan. Different procedures were used to calculate poverty thresholds for two-person families and persons living alone in order to compensate for the relatively larger fixed expenses of these smaller units. For two-person families, the cost of the economy food plan was multiplied by a factor of 3.7 (also derived from the 1955 survey). For unrelated individuals (one-person units), no multiplier was used; poverty thresholds were instead calculated as a fixed proportion of the corresponding thresholds for two-person units. Annual updates of these SSA poverty thresholds were based on price changes of the items in the economy food plan.

As a result of deliberations of a Federal interagency committee in 1969, the following two modifications to the original SSA definition of poverty were adopted: (1) the SSA thresholds for nonfarm families were retained for the base year 1963, but annual adjustments in the levels were based on changes in the Consumer Price Index (CPI) rather than on changes in the cost of foods in the economy food plan; and (2) the farm thresholds were raised from 70 to 85 percent of the corresponding nonfarm levels. The combined impact of these two modifications resulted in an increase in the tabulated totals for 1967 of 360,000 poor families and 1.6 million poor persons.

In 1981 three additional modifications in the poverty definition recommended by another interagency committee were adopted for implementation in the March 1982 CPS as well as the 1980 census: (1) elimination of separate thresholds for farm families, (2) elimination (by averaging) of separate thresholds for female- householder families and "all other" families (earlier termed "male-headed" families) and (3) extension of the detailed poverty threshold matrix to make the largest family size category "nine persons or more." For further details, see the section, "Changes in the Definition of Poverty," in Current Population Reports, Series P-60, No. 133.

The poverty thresholds are increased each year by the same percentage as the annual average Consumer Price Index.

For further information on how the poverty thresholds were developed and subsequent changes in them, see Gordon M. Fisher, "The Development and History of the Poverty Thresholds," Social Security Bulletin, Vol. 55 No. 4, Winter 1992, pp. 3-14.

*



https://allcountries.org/uscensus/757_persons_below_poverty_level_by_selected.html

These tables are based on figures supplied by the United States Census Bureau, U.S. Department of Commerce and are subject to revision by the Census Bureau.

Copyright © 2006 Photius Coutsoukis and Information Technology Associates, all rights reserved.