uscensus banner
| MAIN | SEARCH | FEEDBACK | FAQ | GLOSSARY | COUNTRIES | MAPS | ITA HOME PAGE |

Custom Search

MAIN CATEGORIES:
1. Population
2. Vital Statistics
3. Health and Nutrition
4. Education
5. Law Enforcement, Courts
and Prisons
6. Geography and Environment
7. Parks, Recreation, Travel
8. Elections
9. State and Local Government
Finances and Employment
10. Federal Government
Finances and Employment
11. National Defense and
Veterans Affairs
12. Social Insurance and Human
Services
13. Labor Force, Employment,
and Earnings
14. Income, Expenditures, and
Wealth
15. Prices
16. Banking, Finance, and
Insurance
17. Business Enterprise
18. Communications and
Information Technology
19. Energy
20. Science and Technology
21. Transportation - Land
22. Transportation - Air
and Water
23. Agriculture
24. Natural Resources
25. Construction and Housing
26. Manufactures
27. Domestic Trade and
Services
28. Foreign Commerce and Aid
29. Outlying Areas
30. Comparative International
Statistics
31. Industrial Outlook
32. 1997 Economic Census





740. Mean-Taxes Paid and Taxes Paid as a Percentage of Total Mean Before-Tax Income by Type of Tax in Current and Constant (1997) Dollars

[Households as of March of the following year. Mean taxes paid in current and 1997 CPI-U-X1 adjusted dollars]

 
Mean Taxes Paid
Type of tax Number As a
and (1,000) Current Constant percent
Year dollars (1997) of mean
dollars before-tax
income
 
One or more taxes paid:
  1980 76,171 5,180 10,102 23.1
  1981 77,314 5,718 10,186 23.6
  1982 77,246 5,866 9,848 22.6
  1983 78,513 5,950 9,588 21.8
  1984 80,209 6,398 9,883 21.9
  1985 1 81,943 6,947 10,362 22.5
  1986 82,979 7,647 11,198 23.4
  1987 2 84,411 7,912 11,178 22.9
  1988 86,060 8,292 11,250 22.9
  1989 86,883 9,033 11,692 23.3
  1990 87,597 8,896 10,924 22.4
  1991 88,636 9,007 10,614 22.3
  1992 3 89,232 9,178 10,499 22.2
  1993 4 89,561 10,217 11,348 23.1
  1994 5 91,540 10,768 11,662 23.4
  1995 6 92,754 11,292 11,892 23.7
  1996 94,236 12,118 12,396 24.3
  1997 95,850 13,077 13,077 24.9
 
Federal income taxes:
  1980 61,316 4,011 7,822 15.3
  1981 62,577 4,332 7,717 15.4
  1982 62,924 4,251 7,137 14.1
  1983 64,654 4,127 6,650 13.1
  1984 67,059 4,326 6,683 13.0
  1985 1 68,019 4,675 6,973 13.2
  1986 68,873 5,236 7,668 13.9
  1987 2 68,325 5,304 7,494 13.2
  1988 68,608 5,469 7,420 12.8
  1989 69,138 5,950 7,701 13.0
  1990 70,255 5,806 7,130 12.4
  1991 69,842 5,901 6,954 12.3
  1992 3 68,957 6,029 6,897 12.1
  1993 4 68,786 7,098 7,884 13.3
  1994 5 69,501 7,591 8,221 13.5
  1995 6 70,926 7,935 8,357 13.7
  1996 72,009 8,637 8,835 14.3
  1997 73,941 9,445 9,445 14.9
 
State income taxes:
  1980 52,591 859 1,675 3.3
  1981 52,615 885 1,576 3.2
  1982 52,895 967 1,623 3.3
  1983 53,783 1,084 1,747 3.5
  1984 55,756 1,194 1,844 3.6
  1985 1 57,033 1,330 1,984 3.8
  1986 58,133 1,442 2,112 3.9
  1987 2 60,382 1,609 2,273 4.1
  1988 62,045 1,729 2,346 4.2
  1989 62,987 1,914 2,477 4.4
  1990 61,875 1,710 2,100 3.8
  1991 62,314 1,761 2,075 3.8
  1992 3 62,247 1,837 2,101 3.9
  1993 4 62,459 2,045 2,271 4.4
  1994 5 63,626 2,194 2,376 4.1
  1995 6 64,827 2,296 2,418 4.2
  1996 65,856 2,467 2,524 4.3
  1997 67,164 2,674 2,674 4.5
 
FICA payroll taxes:
  1980 62,061 1,114 2,173 4.6
  1981 62,441 1,370 2,440 5.2
  1982 62,541 1,470 2,468 5.2
  1983 63,308 1,559 2,512 5.2
  1984 64,696 1,699 2,625 5.3
  1985 1 66,090 1,894 2,825 5.6
  1986 66,835 2,049 3,001 5.7
  1987 2 68,523 2,151 3,039 5.7
  1988 70,096 2,396 3,251 6.0
  1989 70,423 2,559 3,312 6.0
  1990 70,942 2,692 3,306 6.2
  1991 71,466 2,807 3,308 6.3
  1992 3 72,516 2,889 3,305 6.3
  1993 4 72,264 2,961 3,289 6.1
  1994 5 74,050 3,107 3,365 6.1
  1995 6 75,096 3,193 3,363 6.1
  1996 76,724 3,330 3,406 6.0
  1997 77,999 3,508 3,508 6.1
 
Property taxes on own home:
  1980 52,328 575 1,121 2.3
  1981 52,800 649 1,156 2.4
  1982 51,151 737 1,237 2.6
  1983 51,777 737 1,188 2.4
  1984 52,694 774 1,196 2.4
  1985 1 53,298 811 1,210 2.3
  1986 54,076 851 1,246 2.3
  1987 2 55,919 952 1,345 2.5
  1988 57,006 968 1,313 2.4
  1989 57,853 1,099 1,422 2.5
  1990 58,472 1,125 1,382 2.5
  1991 59,403 1,119 1,319 2.5
  1992 3 59,838 1,213 1,388 2.6
  1993 4 60,554 1,230 1,366 2.5
  1994 5 62,121 1,257 1,361 2.4
  1995 6 63,377 1,361 1,433 2.5
  1996 64,559 1,433 1,466 2.6
  1997 65,998 1,390 1,390 2.3



1 Recording of amounts for earnings from longest job increased to $299,999. Full implementation of 1980 census-based sample design.
2 Implementation of a new March CPS processsing system.
3 Implementation of 1990 census population controls.
4 Data collection method changed from paper and pencil to computer assisted interviewing. In addition, the March 1994 income supplement was revised to allow for the coding of different income amounts on selected questionnaire items. Limits either increased or decreased in the following categories: earnings increased to $999,999; social security increased to $49,999; supplemental security income and public assistance increased to $24,999; veterans' benefits increased to $99,999; child support and alimony decreased to $49,999.
5 Introduction of 1990 census sample design.
6 Full implementation of the 1990 census-based sample design and metropolitan definitions, 7,000 household sample reduction, and revised race edits.

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Internet site (accessed 8 June 1999).

http://WWW.CENSUS.GOV/hhes/income/histinc/incexper.html

* Definitions

Households

Households consist of all people who occupy a housing unit. The Census Bureau regards a house, an apartment or other group of rooms, or a single room as a housing unit when it is occupied or intended for occupancy as separate living quarters: the occupants do not live and eat with any other people in the structure and there is direct access from the outside or through a common hall.

A household includes the related family members and all unrelated people, if any, such as lodgers, foster children, wards, or employees who share the housing unit. The Census Bureau also counts a person living alone in a housing unit or a group of unrelated people sharing a housing unit as partners as a household. The count of households excludes group quarters.

Householder

The householder refers to the person (or one of the people) who owns or rents (maintains) the housing unit. If a married couple owns the housing unit jointly, the interviewer may list either as the householder. The person listed first is the householder and is the "reference person" to whom the Census Bureau designates the relationship of all other household members. The number of householders is equal to the number of households. Also, the number of family householders is equal to the number of families.

Income

For each person in the sample 15 years old and over, the CPS asks questions on the amount of money income received in the preceding calendar year from each of the following sources:

1. Earnings 2. Unemployment compensation 3. Workers' compensation 4. Social security 5. Supplemental security income 6. Public assistance 7. Veterans' payments 8. Survivor benefits 9. Disability benefits 10. Pension or retirement income 11. Interest 12. Dividends 13. Rents, royalties, and estates and trusts 14. Educational assistance 15. Alimony 16. Child support 17. Financial assistance from outside of the household 18. Other income

It should be noted that although the income statistics refer to receipts during the preceding calendar year, the demographic characteristics, such as age, labor force status, and family or household composition, are as of the survey date. The income of the family/household does not include amounts received by people who were members during all or part of the income year if these people no longer resided in the family/household at the time of interview. However, the CPS collects income data for people who are current residents but did not reside in the household during the income year.

Data on consumer income collected in the CPS by the Census Bureau cover money income received (exclusive of certain money receipts such as capital gains) before payments for personal income taxes, social security, union dues, medicare deductions, etc. Therefore, money income does not reflect the fact that some families receive part of their income in the form of noncash benefits, such as food stamps, health benefits, rent-free housing, and goods produced and consumed on the farm. In addition, money income does not reflect the fact that noncash benefits are also received by some nonfarm residents which often take the form of the use of business transportation and facilities, full or partial payments by business for retirement programs, medical and educational expenses, etc. Data users should consider these elements when comparing income levels. Moreover, readers should be aware that for many different reasons there is a tendency in household surveys for respondents to underreport their income. Based on an analysis of independently derived income estimates, the Census Bureau determined that respondents report income earned from wages or salaries much better than other sources of income and that the reported wage and salary income is nearly equal to independent estimates of aggregate income.

Median income

Median income is the amount which divides the income distribution into two equal groups, half having incomes above the median, half having incomes below the median. The medians for households, families, and unrelated individuals are based on all households, families, and unrelated individuals, respectively. The medians for people are based on people 15 years old and over with income.

*



https://allcountries.org/uscensus/740_mean_taxes_paid_and_taxes_paid.html

These tables are based on figures supplied by the United States Census Bureau, U.S. Department of Commerce and are subject to revision by the Census Bureau.

Copyright © 2006 Photius Coutsoukis and Information Technology Associates, all rights reserved.