uscensus banner
| MAIN | SEARCH | FEEDBACK | FAQ | GLOSSARY | COUNTRIES | MAPS | ITA HOME PAGE |

Custom Search

MAIN CATEGORIES:
1. Population
2. Vital Statistics
3. Health and Nutrition
4. Education
5. Law Enforcement, Courts
and Prisons
6. Geography and Environment
7. Parks, Recreation, Travel
8. Elections
9. State and Local Government
Finances and Employment
10. Federal Government
Finances and Employment
11. National Defense and
Veterans Affairs
12. Social Insurance and Human
Services
13. Labor Force, Employment,
and Earnings
14. Income, Expenditures, and
Wealth
15. Prices
16. Banking, Finance, and
Insurance
17. Business Enterprise
18. Communications and
Information Technology
19. Energy
20. Science and Technology
21. Transportation - Land
22. Transportation - Air
and Water
23. Agriculture
24. Natural Resources
25. Construction and Housing
26. Manufactures
27. Domestic Trade and
Services
28. Foreign Commerce and Aid
29. Outlying Areas
30. Comparative International
Statistics
31. Industrial Outlook
32. 1997 Economic Census





233. Households and Persons Having Problems with Access to Food: 1995 to 1998

[100,445 represents 100,445,000. Food secure means that a household had access at all times to enough food for an active healthy life, with no need for recourse to emergency food sources or other extraordinary coping behaviors to meet their basic food needs. A food insecure household did not have this same access to enough food to fully meet basic needs at all times. Food insecure households with hunger were those with one or more household members who were hungry at least sometime during the period due to inadequate resources for food. The omission of homeless persons may be a cause of underreporting. Data are from the Food Security Supplement to the Current Population Survey (CPS); for details about the CPS, see text, Section 1, Population, and Appendix III]

 
Household Number (1,000) Percent distribution
food security level
1995 1996 1997 1998 1995 1996 1997 1998
 
  Households, total 100,445 101,508 102,373 103,480 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
Food secure 90,097 90,964 93,459 92,972 89.7 89.6 91.3 89.8
Food insecure 10,348 10,544 8,914 10,509 10.3 10.4 8.7 10.2
  Without hunger 6,402 6,407 5,760 6,820 6.4 6.3 5.6 6.6
  With hunger 3,946 4,137 3,154 3,689 3.9 4.1 3.1 3.6
 
  Adult members 191,063 193,608 195,180 197,423 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
Food secure 172,862 175,003 179,420 178,631 90.5 90.4 91.9 90.5
Food insecure 18,200 18,606 15,761 18,792 9.5 9.6 8.1 9.5
  Without hunger 11,611 11,582 10,601 12,657 6.1 6.0 5.4 6.4
  With hunger 6,589 7,024 5,160 6,135 3.4 3.6 2.6 3.1
 
  Child members 70,279 71,172 70,948 71,463 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
Food secure 58,048 58,218 60,589 59,090 82.6 81.8 85.4 82.7
Food insecure 12,231 12,953 10,359 12,373 17.4 18.2 14.6 17.3
  Without hunger 8,131 8,537 7,444 9,114 11.6 12.0 10.5 12.8
  With hunger 4,100 4,416 2,915 3,259 5.8 6.2 4.1 4.6


Source: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Food and Nutrition Service, Household Food Security in the United States, 1995-1998: Advance Report; July 1999 and Important User Information/ERRATA Tables 1 & 2D in Household Food Security in The United States 1995-1998 Advance Report; September 1999.

http://www.fns.usda.gov/fns/

The Federal food security measure was developed through a collaborative process between private non-government experts, academic researchers, and a Federal interagency working group, with leadership from the Department of Agriculture and the Department of Health and Human Services. The severity of food insecurity and hunger in households is measured through a series of questions about experiences and behaviors known to characterize households that are having difficulty meeting basic food needs. These experiences and behaviors generally occur in an ordered sequence as the severity of food insecurity increases. As resources become more constrained, adults in typical households first worry about having enough food, then they stretch household resources and juggle other necessities, then decrease the quality and variety of household members diets, then decrease the frequency and quantity of adults food intake, and finally decrease the frequency and quantity of childrens food intake. All questions refer to the previous 12 months and include a qualifying phrase reminding respondents to report only those occurrences that resulted from inadequate financial resources. Restrictions to food intake due to dieting or busy schedules are excluded.



https://allcountries.org/uscensus/233_households_and_persons_having_problems_with.html

These tables are based on figures supplied by the United States Census Bureau, U.S. Department of Commerce and are subject to revision by the Census Bureau.

Copyright © 2006 Photius Coutsoukis and Information Technology Associates, all rights reserved.