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32. 1997 Economic Census





1155. Paper and Paperboard--Production, New Supply, and Ratio of New Supply to Real GDP

[In thousands of short tons (63,600 represents 63,600,000), except ratio. For definitions, see Terms below table]

 
Item 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999
 
Production, total............................................................ 63,600 64,259 60,951 66,748 70,249 68,683 72,505 75,951 78,299 78,573 80,445 81,234 84,701 86,693 90,897 91,325 92,199 96,846 96,343 96,902
  Paper, total..................................................................... 30,116 30,901 30,245 32,802 34,446 34,061 35,550 36,919 38,353 38,266 39,361 39,084 40,973 41,745 43,356 42,868 42,481 44,697 44,777 46,012
  Paperboard, total..................................................................... 30,926 31,208 29,045 32,145 34,002 32,922 35,355 37,442 38,234 38,519 39,318 40,343 41,895 43,113 45,724 46,640 47,901 50,332 49,749 50,890
   Unbleached kraft..................................................................... 15,295 15,602 14,535 16,122 17,185 16,368 17,680 18,898 19,140 19,490 20,357 20,960 21,658 21,447 22,469 22,697 22,178 23,222 23,199 22,958
   Semichemical..................................................................... 4,724 4,719 4,389 4,730 5,169 5,088 5,376 5,536 5,664 5,656 5,640 5,552 5,762 5,672 5,943 5,662 5,619 6,047 5,894 5,954
   Bleached kraft..................................................................... 3,836 3,886 3,644 3,895 4,011 3,911 4,207 4,406 4,511 4,521 4,399 4,572 4,503 4,583 5,029 5,304 5,236 5,548 5,487 5,712
   Recycled..................................................................... 7,071 7,001 6,477 7,398 7,637 7,555 8,092 8,602 8,919 8,852 8,921 9,259 9,973 11,410 12,283 12,977 14,868 15,514 15,170 16,266
  Wet machine board E..................................................................... 138 160 129 140 140 130 130 120 100 99 96 96 93 95 96 96 96 96 96 (NA)
  Building paper E..................................................................... 1,369 1,144 798 760 700 680 600 600 732 706 723 782 795 797 787 787 787 787 787 (NA)
  Insulating board E..................................................................... 1,051 846 735 900 960 890 870 870 880 982 946 929 945 943 934 934 934 934 934 (NA)
 
New supply, all grades,
excluding products... 67,783 68,732 65,705 71,644 77,247 76,199 79,725 83,932 86,427 86,123 87,683 86,014 89,631 93,146 97,448 98,164 95,896 101,201 102,869 (NA)
  Paper, total..................................................................... 37,126 37,547 37,176 40,133 43,510 43,557 45,332 47,527 49,085 48,376 49,485 47,380 49,232 51,246 53,077 52,769 50,687 54,149 55,068 (NA)
    Newsprint..................................................................... 11,377 11,694 11,514 11,514 12,676 12,758 12,952 13,729 13,555 13,209 13,412 12,462 12,658 12,750 12,889 12,762 11,768 12,612 12,721 (NA)
    Printing/writing papers..................................................................... 16,124 16,139 16,234 18,508 20,473 20,658 22,134 23,487 25,006 24,449 25,456 24,651 26,013 27,846 29,444 29,550 28,300 30,751 31,384 (NA)
     Uncoated groundwood..................................................................... 2,086 2,001 2,068 2,414 2,833 2,960 3,094 3,196 3,465 3,528 3,713 3,552 3,515 4,342 4,589 4,967 4,456 4,818 4,983 (NA)
     Coated..................................................................... 4,644 4,843 4,979 5,799 6,592 6,289 6,686 7,433 8,060 7,821 8,254 7,876 8,588 9,072 9,669 9,720 8,853 10,263 10,584 (NA)
     Uncoated free sheet..................................................................... 8,015 7,870 7,896 8,889 9,546 10,005 10,836 11,331 11,810 11,542 12,024 11,824 12,524 12,924 13,639 13,355 13,476 14,080 14,213 (NA)
     Thin and cotton fiber..................................................................... 415 439 394 423 478 413 449 450 472 382 321 262 209 212 183 129 135 118 124 (NA)
     Bleached bristols..................................................................... 964 986 897 983 1,024 991 1,069 1,078 1,199 1,175 1,145 1,137 1,177 1,295 1,363 1,379 1,380 1,475 1,480 (NA)
  Packaging and ind. conv. papers..................................................................... 5,243 5,241 5,007 5,327 5,427 5,163 5,106 4,990 5,030 4,982 4,718 4,596 4,783 4,628 4,640 4,241 4,325 4,265 4,285 (NA)
   Unbleached kraft..................................................................... 3,707 3,654 3,347 3,431 3,455 3,242 3,153 2,919 2,852 2,796 2,499 2,378 2,467 2,306 2,391 2,034 1,928 1,801 1,731 (NA)
   Other..................................................................... 1,536 1,587 1,660 1,896 1,972 1,921 1,953 2,071 2,178 2,186 2,219 2,218 2,317 2,322 2,250 2,207 2,397 2,465 2,553 (NA)
  Tissue..................................................................... 4,382 4,473 4,421 4,784 4,934 4,978 5,140 5,321 5,494 5,737 5,899 5,672 5,778 6,022 6,105 6,215 6,294 6,521 6,680 (NA)
Paperboard, total..................................................................... 27,689 28,717 26,504 29,301 31,515 30,595 32,548 34,613 35,438 35,806 36,301 36,753 38,453 39,950 42,435 43,448 43,214 45,061 45,597 (NA)
  Unbleached kraft..................................................................... 12,958 13,764 12,639 13,890 15,169 14,589 15,522 16,676 16,930 17,212 17,780 17,794 18,515 18,456 19,322 19,743 17,837 18,477 19,313 (NA)
  Semichemical..................................................................... 4,433 4,616 4,251 4,607 5,124 4,964 5,263 5,472 5,670 5,637 5,609 5,482 5,730 5,774 6,114 5,830 5,689 6,089 5,974 (NA)
  Bleached board..................................................................... 3,287 3,330 3,119 3,380 3,533 3,445 3,639 3,787 3,878 3,813 3,638 3,781 3,690 3,788 4,173 4,283 4,244 4,372 4,365 (NA)
  Recycled..................................................................... 7,011 7,007 6,495 7,424 7,689 7,597 8,125 8,677 8,960 9,144 9,273 9,695 10,518 11,931 12,826 13,592 15,444 16,124 15,944 (NA)
Construction and other..................................................................... 2,968 2,468 2,025 2,210 2,222 2,048 1,845 1,792 1,903 1,941 1,897 1,881 1,946 1,949 1,935 1,947 1,994 1,991 2,203 (NA)
 
Ratio of new supply to real GDP 1: (NA)
  Total paper..................................................................... 8.050 7.947 8.040 8.344 8.468 8.173 8.257 8.414 8.372 7.982 8.061 7.794 7.884 8.020 8.029 7.803 7.240 7.445 7,282 (NA)
  Newsprint..................................................................... 2.467 2.475 2.490 2.394 2.467 2.394 2.359 2.431 2.312 2.180 2.185 2.050 2.027 1.995 1.950 1.887 1.682 1.735 1,684 (NA)
  Paperboard, total..................................................................... 6.004 6.078 5.732 6.092 6.133 5.741 5.929 6.128 6.045 5.908 5.913 6.046 6.158 6.252 6.419 6.431 6.235 6.196 6,038 (NA)
 



1 GDP = Gross domestic product. See table 692.

Source: American Forest and Paper Association, Washington, DC, Monthly Statistical Summary of Paper, Paperboard and Woodpulp.

http://www.afandpa.org/

* Terms

Base Paper (Body Stock)-The base stock for plain or decorated coated papers and boards. It may be uncoated or precoated on the paper machine. It is also used in connection with industrial papers before they are treated. Because it can usually be custom made and has a variety of uses, it cannot be described as containing certain amounts of any particular kind of pulp nor is there any way to refer to weights and colors.

Bond Paper-Originally a cotton-content writing or printing paper designed for the printing of bonds, legal documents, etc., and distinguished by superior strength, performance and durability. The term is now also applied to papers such as letterhead, business forms, social correspondence papers, etc. Properties include printability, erasability, whiteness, cleanliness, freedom from fuzz, uniform finish, and good formation.

Coated Paper-Any paper, which has been coated. This term covers a wide range of qualities, basis weights, and uses.

Construction Paper -Sheathing paper, roofing, floor covering, automotive, sound proofing, industrial, pipe covering, refrigerator, and similar felts.

Containerboard-Solid fibre or corrugated and combined board used in the manufacture of shipping containers and related products. Also the component materials used in fabrication of corrugated board and solid fibre combined board.

Chipboard-A paperboard used for many purposes that may or may not have specifications of strength, color, or other characteristics. It is normally made from a paper stock with a relatively low density in thickness of .006 of an inch and up.

Corrugated Container-A box, its most common form, is manufactured from containerboard - layers of linerboard and one layer of medium. The layers are combined on a corrugator, a machine that presses corrugations into the medium and laminates a layer of linerboard to each side. The sheets are folded, printed, and glued or stapled to make a finished box.

Corrugating Medium-A paperboard used by corrugating plants to form the corrugated or fluted component in making corrugated combined board, corrugated wrapping, and the like. It is usually made from chemical or semichemical wood pulps, straw, or reclaimed paper stock on cylinder or fourdrinier machines.

Cotton Fiber-Paper that contains 25% or more cellulose fibers derived from lint cotton, cotton linters and cotton or linen cloth cuttings. Sometimes flax is used in place of linen cuttings. The term is used interchangeably with rag content and cotton content papers.

Cover Paper-Any wide variety of fairly heavy plain or embellished papers, which are converted into, covers for books, catalogs, brochures, pamphlets, etc. It is a specific coated or uncoated grade made from chemical wood pulps, and/or cotton pulps. Good folding qualities, printability, and durability characterize it.

Cylinder Paper Machine-One of the principal types of papermaking machines, characterized by the use of wire-covered cylinders or molds, on which a web is formed. These cylinders may be partially immersed and rotated in vats containing a dilute stock suspension or may be equipped with a headbox or other apparatus for distributing the fibers. The pulp fibers are formed into a sheet on the mold as the water drains through, leaving the fibers on the cylinder face. The wet sheet is couched off the cylinder onto a felt, which is held against the cylinder by a couch roll. A cylinder machine may consist of one or several cylinders, each supplied with the same or with different kinds of stock. In the case of a multi-cylinder machine, the webs are successively couched one upon the other before entering the press section. This permits wide latitude in thickness or weight of the finished sheet, as well as in the kind of stock used for the different layers of the sheet. The press section and the dry end of the machine are essentially the same as those of other types of machines.

Deinking-A process in which most of the ink, filler and other extraneous material is removed from printed and/or unprinted recovered paper. The result is a pulp which can be used, along with varying percentages of wood pulp, in the manufacture of new paper, including printing, writing and office papers as well as tissue.

Digester-A cylindrical or spherical vessel used to treat cellulosic materials with chemicals under elevated pressure and temperature, so as to produce pulp for papermaking.

Envelope Paper-Any uncoated printing-writing paper used in the manufacture of envelopes. Desirable properties include smooth fold, strength at crease, good printability, and lack of tendency to curl or cockle. Basis weights normally range from 16# to 44# (17" x 22" - 500).

Brown Kraft Envelope-Fourdrinier machine finished or machine glazed paper, usually made from unbleached sulfate pulp or dyed bleached sulfate pulp, used in the manufacture of envelopes when strength is a primary requirement.

White Kraft Envelope-Fourdrinier machine finished or machine glazed paper usually made from bleached sulfate pulp, in white and colors. It is used in the manufacture of envelopes when strength is a primary requirement.

Wove Envelopes-General purpose paper, either white or colors, used primarily for commercial purposes. Also refers to commodity envelope base stock. Bond, cotton fiber, text grades, and similar distinctive grades used for envelope end use are not included in this category; rather they are included with their unique grades.

Form Bond-A lightweight commodity paper designed primarily for printed business forms. It is usually made from chemical wood and/or mechanical pulps. Important product qualities include good perforating, folding, punching, and manifolding properties. The most common end use for this grade is carbon-interleaved multi-part computer printout paper, which is marginally punched, crossperforated, and fanfolded. Fourdrinier Paper Machine-Named after its sponsor, with its modifications and the Cylinder machine, comprise the machines normally employed in the manufacture of all grades of paper and board. The fourdrinier machine, for descriptive purposes, may be divided into four sections: the wet end, the press section, the drier section, and the calender section. In the wet end, the pulp or stock flows from a headbox through a slice onto a moving endless belt of wire cloth, called the fourdrinier wire or wire, of brass, bronze, stainless steel, or plastic. The wire runs over a breast roll under or adjacent to the headbox, over a series of tube or table rolls or more recently drainage blades, which maintain the working surface of the wire in a plane and aid water removal. The tubes or rolls create a vacuum on the downstream side of the nip. Similarly, the drainage blades create a vacuum on the downstream side where the wire leaves the blade surface, but also performs the function of a doctor blade on the upstream side. The wire then passes over a series of suction boxes, over the bottom couch roll (or suction couch roll), which drives the wire and then down and back over various guide rolls and a stretch roll to the breast roll. The second section, the press section, usually consists of two or more presses, the function of which is to mechanically remove further excess of water from the sheet and to equalize the surface characteristics of the felt and wire sides of the sheet. The wet web of paper, which is transferred from the wire to the felt at the couch roll, is carried through the presses on the felts; the texture and character of the felts vary according to the grade of paper being made. The third section, the drier section, consists of two or more tiers of driers. These driers are steam-heated cylinders, and the paper is held close to the driers by means of fabric drier felts. As the paper passes from one drier to the next, first the felt side and then the wire side comes in contact with the heated surface of the drier. As the paper enters the drier train approximately one-third dry, the bulk of the water is evaporated in this section. Moisture removal may be facilitated by blowing hot air onto the sheet and in between the driers in order to carry away the water vapor. Within the drier section and at a point at least 50% along the drying curve, a breaker stack is sometimes used for imparting finish and to facilitate drying. This equipment is usually comprised of a pair of chilled iron and/or rubber surfaced rolls. There may also be a size press located within the drier section, or more properly, at a point where the paper moisture content is approximately 5 percent. The fourth section of the machine, the calender section, consists of from one to three calender stacks with a reel device for winding the paper into a roll as it leaves the paper machine. The purpose of the calender stacks is to finish the paper, i.e., the paper is smoothed and the desired finish, thickness or gloss is imparted to the sheet. The reel winds the finished paper into a roll, which for further finishing either can be taken to a rewinder or, as in the case of some machines, the rewinder on the machine produces finished rolls directly from the machine reel. The wire, the press section, the several drier sections, the calender stacks, and the reel are so driven that proper tension is maintained in the web of paper despite its elongation or shrinkage during its passage through the machine. There are two modifications of the fourdrinier in use, known as the Harper and the Yankee or M.G. machine, which in principle are similar to the fourdrinier machine. Freesheet-Paper free of mechanical wood pulp or paper made from pulps having a high freeness (the rate at which water drains from a stock suspension through a wire mesh screen or a perforated plate).

Grade-(1) A class or level of quality of a paper or pulp which is ranked, or distinguished from other papers or pulps, on the basis of its use, appearance, quality, manufacturing history, raw materials, or a combination of these factors. Some grades have been officially identified and described; others are commonly recognized but lack official definition. (2) With reference to one particular quality, one item (q.v.) differing from another only in size, weight, or grain; e.g., an offset book paper cut grain long is not the same grade as the same paper cut grain short.

Groundwood Paper--Papers other than newsprint, made with substantial proportions of mechanical pulp, and used for printing or converting.

Insulating Board-A type of board composed of some fibrous material, such as wood or other vegetable fiber, sized throughout, and felted or pressed together in such a way as to contain a large quantity of entrapped or "dead" air. It is made either by cementing together several thin layers or forming a nonlaminated layer of the required thickness. It is used in plain or decorative finishes for interior walls and ceilings in thicknesses of 0.5 and 1 inch (in some cases up to 3 inches) and also as a water-repellent finish for house sheathing. Desirable properties are low thermal conductivity, moisture resistance, fire resistance, permanency, vermin and insect resistance, and structural strength. No single material combines all these properties but all should be permanent and should be treated to resist moisture absorption.

Kraft Bag Paper-A paper made of sulfate pulp and used in the manufacture of paper bags. It normally has a greater bulk and a rougher surface than the usual kraft wrapping paper. Kraft Paper-A paper made essentially from wood pulp produced by a modified sulfate pulping process. It is a comparatively coarse paper particularly noted for its strength, and in unbleached grades is primarily used as a wrapper or packaging material. It can be watermarked, striped, or calendered, and it has an acceptable surface for printing. Its natural unbleached color is brown but by the use of semibleached or fully bleached sulfate pulps it can be produced in lighter shades of brown, cream tints, and white. In addition to its use as a wrapping paper, it is converted into such products as: grocery bags, envelopes, gummed sealing tape, asphalted papers, multiwall sacks, tire wraps, butcher wraps, waxed paper, coated paper, as well as specialty bags and sacks.

Newsprint-A lightweight paper, made mainly from mechanical wood pulp, engineered to be bright and opaque for the good print contrast needed by newspapers. Newsprint also contains special tensile strength for repeated folding. It does not includes printing papers of types generally used for purposes other than newspapers such as groundwood printing papers for catalogs, directories, etc.

Offset Paper-Paper designed for use in offset lithography. Important properties include good internal bonding, high strength, dimensional stability, lack of curl, and freedom from fuzz and foreign surface material. Used on both sheet-fed and web presses. This is commodity offset.

Premium/Opaque Offset-High quality offset markedly brighter and more opaque than Offset Paper as defined above. It is usually produced in smooth and vellum finishes and may have a companion cover paper. This is a mid-range product between Offset Paper and higher quality papers in the Text and Cover category.

Packaging Papers-These papers are used to wrap or package consumer and industrial products such as grocer's bags and sacks, shopping and merchandise bags, and multiwall shipping sacks used for shipping such products as cement, flour, sugar, chemicals and animal food. "Specialty" packaging papers are used for cookies, potato chips, ice cream, and similar products. Paper-The name for all kinds of matted or felted sheets of fiber (usually vegetable, but sometimes mineral, animal or synthetic) formed on a fine screen from a water suspension. Paper derives its name from papyrus, a sheet made by pasting together thin sections of an Egyptian reed (Cyperus papyrus) and used in ancient times as a writing material. Paper and paperboard are the two broad categories of paper. Paper is usually lighter in basis weight, thinner, and more flexible than paperboard. Its largest uses are for printing, writing, wrapping, and sanitary purposes, although it is employed for a wide variety of other uses.

Paperboard-One of the two subdivisions of paper. The distinction is not great, but paperboard is heavier in basis weight, thicker, and more rigid than paper. All sheets 12 points (0.012 inch) or more in thickness are classified as paperboard. There are exceptions. Blotting paper, felts, and drawing paper in excess of 12 points are classified as paper while corrugating medium, chipboard, and linerboard less than 12 points are classified as paperboard. The broad classes within paperboard include containerboard, boxboard, and all other paperboard.

Bleached Board-A general term covering any board composed of 100% bleached fiber.

Bleached Packaging Paperboard-A paperboard made from approximately 85% virgin bleached chemical pulp.

Bleached Paperboard-A general term covering any board composed of 100% bleached fiber.

Boxboard-The general term designating the paperboard used for fabricating boxes. It may be made of wood pulp or paper stocks or any combinations of these and may be plain, lined, or clay coated.

Clay-coated boxboard-A grade of paperboard that has been clay coated on one or both sides to obtain whiteness and smoothness. It is characterized by brightness, resistance to fading, and excellence of printing surface. Colored coatings may also be used and the body stock for coating may be any variety of paperboard.

Folding Boxboard-A paperboard suitable for the manufacture of folding cartons, which can be made from a variety of raw materials on either a cylinder machine or a fourdrinier machine. It possesses qualities that permit scoring and folding, and has variable surface properties depending upon the printing requirements. This classification includes such products as clay-coated boxboard, white patent coated news, manila lined news, and fourdrinier bleached kraft board.

Linerboard-A paperboard that is used as the facing material in the production of corrugated and solid fibre shipping containers.

Medium-The paperboard grade used to form the inner layer of corrugated board. It can be made of recycled material or wood pulp.

Recycled Paperboard-Paperboard manufactured using 100 percent recovered paper, such as old newspapers, old corrugated containers, and mixed papers. Products include linerboard and corrugating medium; folding boxboard (both clay coated and uncoated) used for packaging cereal and other food products, soap powders, and other dry products; set-up boxboard, used for candy boxes, shoe boxes, perfume boxes and similar products. Recycled paperboard is also used for many non-packaging products, such as gypsum wallboard facing, tubes, cans and drums, matches, tags, tickets, game boards, and puzzles.

Solid Bleached KraftThe major uses are in clay-coated folding boxes for such products as frozen foods, butter, ice cream, and cosmetics, and cartons for milk, juices and other moist, liquid and oily foods, as well as for plates, dishes, trays, and cups.

Unbleached Kraft-The primary grade is linerboard, used as the facing material for corrugated boxes. Kraft folding boxboard is usually clay coated. Its largest market is beverage carriers. Other products include drums, cans, and tubes.

Printing-Writing-Any paper suitable for printing, such as book paper, bristols, newsprint, writing paper, etc.

Fine Paper-A broad term including printing, writing, and cover papers, as distinguished from wrapping papers and paper not generally used for printing purposes, which are generally referred to as coarse papers.

Pulp-Fibrous material prepared from wood, cotton, grasses, etc., by chemical or mechanical processes for use in making paper or cellulose products.

Chemical Pulp-Pulp obtained by digestion of wood with solutions of various chemicals. The paper produced is strong and less prone to discoloration. The pulp yield is lower in this process. The principal chemical processes are the sulfate (kraft), sulfite, and soda processes. Chemical pulps are used to make shipping containers, paper bags, printing and writing papers, and other products requiring strength.

Brown Pulp-A groundwood pulp made from wood, which is steamed before grinding. The color-bearing, non-cellulosic components of the wood remain with the pulp. The pulp is generally used for wrapping and bag paper.

Dissolving Pulp/Special Alpha- A special grade of chemical pulp usually made from wood or cotton linters for use in the manufacture of regenerated or cellulose derivatives such as acetate, nitrate, etc.

Fluff Pulp-A chemical, mechanical or combination chemical/mechanical pulp, usually bleached, used as an absorbent medium in disposable diapers, bedpads and hygienic personal products. Also known as "fluffing" or "comminution" pulp.

Kraft (Sulfate) Pulp-Term refers to a strong papermaking fiber produced by the kraft process where the active cooking agent is a mixture of sodium hydroxide and sodium sulfide. The term "kraft" is commonly used interchangeable with "sulfate" and is derived from a German word which means strong.

Market Pulp-Wood, cotton, or other pulp produced for, and sold on, the open market, as opposed to that which is produced for internal consumption by an integrated paper mill or affiliated mill.

Mechanical Pulp-Any wood pulp manufactured wholly or in part by a mechanical process, including stone-ground wood, chemigroundwood and chip mechanical pulp. Paper made by this process is opaque and has good printing properties, but it is weak and discolors easily when exposed to light due to residual lignin in the pulp. Uses include newsprint printing papers, specialty papers, tissue, toweling, paperboard and wallboard.

Sulfite Pulp-A papermaking fiber produced by an acid chemical process in which the cooking liquor contains an excess of SO2. The sulfite liquor is a combination of a soluble (such as ammonium, calcium, sodium, or magnesium) and sulfurous acid. Calcium was commonly used in the past but is not as widely used now because of chemical recovery and pollution abatement problems.

Unbleached Pulp-Pulp not treated with any bleaching agents.

Recovery Boiler-In wood pulping, a unit for concentrating black liquor to a stage where the residual carbon is then burned out and the inorganic sodium salts melted and recovered.

Recycled Fiber-Cellulose fiber reclaimed from waste material and reused, sometimes with a minor portion of virgin material, to produce new paper.

Recycled Paper-Usually old newspaper or waste paper used with very little refining, often with groundwood or semi-bleached kraft.

Solid Bleached Bristols-A heavier printing paper produced on cylinder or fourdrinier paper machines in whites and colors. It is also used for conversion into office products and school supplies. Examples of bristols include index cards, tags, file folders, boarding passes, business cards, and postcards. Coated bristols are generally used for menus and as covers for booklets or pamphlets.

Specialty-Grades of paper and/or paperboard made with specific characteristics and properties to adapt them to particular uses. Also refers to grades made in a given mill that are not the primary products of that mill.

Specialty Extrusion Coating-A coating, which is applied by means of extrusion, either simultaneous with or separate from the actual extrusion itself. Coatings of the extrusion type are normally quite quick, solvent based and applied at elevated temperatures, usually associated with plastics.

Specialty Industrial Paper-Papers intended for industrial uses, as opposed to those for cultural or sanitary purposes. Paper and board of all thickness and fiber types designed for special uses and manufactured to exact customer specifications. Includes abrasive paper, electrical insulation, filter paper, and similar grades.

Text Paper-A paper of fine quality and texture for printing. Text papers are manufactured in white and colors, from bleached chemical wood pulp or cotton fiber content furnishes with a decked or plain edge, and are sometimes watermarked. They are made in a wide variety of finishes, including antique, vellum, smooth, felt-marked, and patterned surfaces-some with laid formations. Designed for advertising printing, the principal use of text papers is for booklets, brochures, fine books, announcements, annual reports, menus, folders, etc.

Thin Papers-Includes carbonizing, cigarette, bible and similar papers.

Tissue-A general term indicating a class of papers of characteristic gauzy texture, in some cases fairly transparent. Includes sanitary tissues, wrapping tissue, waxing tissue stock, twisting tissue stock, fruit and vegetable wrapping tissue stock, pattern tissue stock, sales-book tissue stock, and creped wadding. Tissue papers are made on any type of paper machine, from any type of pulp including reclaimed paper stock. They may be glazed, unglazed, or creped, and are used for a variety of purposes. Examples are primarily sanitary grades such as toilet, facial, napkin, toweling, wipes, and special sanitary papers. There are also waxing, wrapping, and miscellaneous non-sanitary grades.

At-home products-Tissue products you purchase in the grocery store for use at your personal home.

Away-from-Home products-Tissue products seen servicing washrooms in airports, hotels, industry, office buildings, etc.

Facial Tissue-The name given the class of soft absorbent papers in the sanitary tissue group. Originally used for removal of creams, oil, etc., from the skin, it is now used in large volume for packaged facial tissue, toilet paper, paper napkins, professional towels, industrial wipes, and for hospital items. It is made of bleached sulfite or sulfate pulp, sometimes mixed with bleached and mechanical pulp, on a single-cylinder or fourdrinier Yankee machine. Desirable characteristics are softness, strength, and freedom from lint.

Wallboard (1) A type of fibreboard composed of a number of layers of chip, binders, or pulpboard, molded or pasted together and generally sized, either throughout or on the surface. It may also be nonlaminated and homogenous in nature. Wallboard is generally 3/16 to of an inch in thickness. (2) A general term used to indicate a composition material used in the construction of partitions, side walls, and ceilings in interior construction; it is made generally of waste papers, wood pulp, or wood or other materials.

Wet Machine Board-A very thick paperboard, used for bookbinders, shoeboard, automotive board, chair seat backing, coaster board, and the like. *



https://allcountries.org/uscensus/1155_paper_and_paperboard_production_new_supply.html

These tables are based on figures supplied by the United States Census Bureau, U.S. Department of Commerce and are subject to revision by the Census Bureau.

Copyright © 2006 Photius Coutsoukis and Information Technology Associates, all rights reserved.